Emerica / Welcome Skate Store Blog

The Welcome Footwear Guide – Emerica Westgate CC & Vulc Mid

(Featured: Welcome Skate Store blog, 22nd July 2015.)

Following on from his previous runner style model, for this season Emerica and Brandon Westgate slimmed down the Westgate G6 shoe producing two variants of the original model to sit alongside it; The Westgate CC (Cupsole Construction) & Mid Vulc. With this in mind we’re highlighting the differences between the cup and vulc equivalents as the purpose of these models was to allow the everyday skateboarder different options at a more affordable price tag, so here’s our way of helping decide which is better suited to you.

Emerica Westgate CC x Vulc

It’s worth bearing in mind that while both shoes have the same shaped toe, the vulc will allow for better flick while the CC is likely to take a little longer for you to adjust to. The softer vulcanised rubber and extra toe bumper will be more responsive initially whereas the cupsole’s smoother and harder nature will require a longer period of time and also build allow for grooves griptape created grooves in your flicking area. Really it’s all down to personal preference, which is what Emerica and Brandon’s intention was with the dual models so if you want a solid, reliable and classic flick; go vulcanised. If you prefer a sole that keeps stiff and is likely to last a little longer at the expense of a longer break in period; go cupsole.

Emerica Westgate Mid Vulc Toe BoxEmerica Westgate CC Toe Box

Getting down to the main difference in the shoes, the sole construction itself. As you can see in the above photos the Mid Vulc features a the standard, high quality Emerica vulcanised sole with the addition of a toe bumper as also utilised on models such as the Herman Vulc and Reynolds Vulc. Providing a responsive, grippy classic feel with signature Emerica triangle detailing under the ball of your foot on the right shoe and Emerica branding on the left are both in subtlety paced as not to affect performance. The CC makes use of the G6 sole similar to the one used on the Herman G6 (no surprises there) with a slightly rough toe area to allow for increased grip and flick on what would be an otherwise slippery area. The influence from the Westgate G6 is also very apparent at first glance with both the Mid Vulc and CC sharing a similar upper to their predecessor albeit slimmed down to fit the new sole units. Built with completely seamless suede; no panels or even decorative stitching are exposed, further negating any potential blow outs and hotspots.

                         Westgate Mid Vulc SoleWestgate CC G6 Sole

On closer inspection of  the outsoles, there isn’t too much to say about the Mid Vulc I haven’t already. However, this is where the CC really excels. The forefront of the shoe features three grooves allowing your foot flex and for a responsive sole. The tip of the toe also features two higher density abrasion areas to allow for extra grip and reduce wear on areas of the toe box likely to have more pressure applied to it, be pivoted on or even dragged in some cases. This is also echoed in the heel area of the CC to ensure a longer lasting sole and an area that is likely to be dragged when braking and as you can see above. The heel of the vulcanised Westgate is slightly narrower than that of the CC which is down to the nature of vulcanised models always fitting more streamlined than their cupsole counterparts. Though in regards to the shape of the shoe, this the only area where the models differ aside from the raised collar.

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As always the case with cupsoles; the CC provides for better heel lock with the ‘strap’ that wraps around the heel (hosting a debossed Emerica triangle) is made of nubuck, further enforcing the heel stability from the outside in. On the Mid Vulc this same ‘strap’ is suede which will allow for similar heel-lock quality but with more flex. The mid top collar consists of the same padded, mesh that lines the inside of both models. Using this rather than suede allows for breathability in an area that is unlikely to come into contact with griptape. Obviously the Mid Vulc allows for better ankle support of the two shoes whilst the materials used and recessing of the collar around the Achilles area don’t sacrifice ease of movement.

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The lace holes of the CC are dropped down to the mesh on the first, third and top holes to help negate lace blow outs, this is also present on vulc model however, obviously an extra two lace loops bit higher up with one also positioned closer to the ball of your ankle to allow for varying lacing/tightness options. On both models the laces are fairly high up to prevent contact with griptape.

The insole of both models aren’t removable however the Emerica insole is so responsive and comfortable that it negates the need to. The tongues on each shoe are also held in place by nylon straps similar to the ‘Internal Fit System’ introduced with Figgy’s pro shoe. Obviously, these stop the tongue annoyingly shifting around as you skate but also keep the shoe held snug to your foot while the tongue itself is made of the same mesh as the shoe’s inner to providing a comfortable, cushioned and sturdy fit along with increasing airflow. To conclude both the CC and Vulc Mid fit true to size with the CC providing a more sturdy, impact ready sole whilst the vulc model allows for boardfeel and a shorter break in period. Although the Vulc is a little tighter than the CC initially, over the break in period it will loosen off as it moulds to your foot so we recommend staying Gold with your normal shoe size.

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